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CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 1:20pm EST
for anything. so that's the ultimate heavy surf club. frankly from a u.s. standpoint, much of what they want to do is not just wasteful, but wickedness. there's an awful other things the u.n. general assembly would like to see go forward that are really quite bad and they are quite willing to cover for the worst lenders survey human race standpoint, for many standpoints in this way. the nature of such a body insisted it organs that depend within the institutions tend to be the worse you are, the more you have an incentive that might somehow say things about you. they have the worst act varies because it protects them and create a racket for them and their friends. >> host: in your book, "living with the un," the u.s. should seek a buyer and containment of the human investment. postscript the general assembly and appendages by and large are hostile to the united states, wasteful, will basically seek any resources can attempt to use them. but there are numbers to particular institutions of the u.n., a quasi-independent body was branded it the u.n. they generally speaking have a chance which re
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 8:00am EST
but looking at narrower product lines. but now in coming to the u.s., i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic market, so it's a different way of looking at the business. much more in the trenches of day-to-day business in the market rather than in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: for samsung's products is the u.s. and canada, north america, a growth market? >> guest: it still is. i mean, traditionally we've thought developed markets and developing markets, and with developed markets it's being seen as someone mature. but if you look at the last few years of our progress in the u.s. market, we've seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of the digital television or the growth of the phone business. some of it is as we pick up our market share. we're the fastest-growing brand in home appliances, for example, an area where samsung brand hasn't been as well known. but now bringing the same mix of innovation that we brought to televisions and phones, bringing new designs, now we can also grab business in home appliances.
CSPAN
Feb 11, 2013 8:00pm EST
at a narrower product line but now i'm coming to the u.s. i can look at all the different product lines in one geographic context so it's a different way of looking at the business. more in the trenches of day to day business in the market rather than in in the headquarters of the corporation. >> host: or samsung products is the u.s. and canada north america a growth market? >> guest: >> guest: it still lives. traditionally we have developed markets and these developed markets are seen as somewhat mature but if you look at the last few years at our programs in the u.s. market we have seen tremendous growth. some of that is coming from new categories like the rise of digital television or the growth of the phone business. some is a that we pick up market share with the fastest growing brand in home appliances for an example, an area where the samsung brand has not been as well-known but bringing the same mix of innovation that we brought to television to the phones, bringing it did not -- designs and now businesses and home imply innocence. >> host: what is the employment level in the u.s. for
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 1:40am EST
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2013 7:30am EST
tv on c-span2. >> u.s. airways and american airlines have proposed merging the companies. yesterday, house judiciary antitrust subcommittee look into the proposed merger. hearing from airline executives and legal analysts. if approved by federal regulators, the new airline, to be known as american airlines, would become the largest in the country. this is two and a half hours. >> good morning. the judicial, judiciary committee on antitrust regulatory reform administrative law and bankruptcy is in session. by way of introduction, this is the first hearing of the year for the subcommittee. chairman kohl at has give give e great privilege of the chairing this great committee and under -- under a static has jurisdiction, the jurisdiction to me has a duty to examine the competitive impacts of significant transactions on the marketplace. it is a responsibility that i take very seriously from the standpoint of consumer choice and the functioning of free markets. today's hearing is to specifically examine the proposed merger between american airlines and us airways. the resulting airline, with a 2
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 1:00am EST
and this tradition is in the u.s. law that was found just about everywhere. one of the reasons that is true is other nations do not have the statutory damages because in case you make a mistake they go far beyond the cost so, in other places there isn't much of a financial motivation to relieve the laughter people unless they were actually stealing but it's interesting the places that haven't had very use as something they want to adopt and it's probably the most vivid example because they believe they are stopping innovation unless they loosen up the ability of access of the existing culture and the prime minister had been saying exactly this the british innovation may be at stake because they don't have fair use and he would like to be able to have that protection to be let the copyright law, of something called fair dealing which is a list of exemptions of specific things you can do rather than make up your own mind that it should be transformative inappropriate they rerouted so it was long of an invitation to make the decision by itself again for the reason they believed it is associated with in
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30pm EST
into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to their kids about a difficult subject. so that is why the format is kind of like an illustrated picture book. as i started looking into there are families that are involved in the policy to eradicate coca, as well as family and social economic issues. the history of coca, especially with the relationships of cocaine and the coca-cola company, and the drug problem that we have today. it got really complicated. it is now a book
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30am EST
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 12:00pm EST
minutes from now. until then a look at comments by u.s. army chief of staff general ray odierno. he said friday the greatest threat facing our nation is fiscal uncertainty and potential budget shortfalls. >> good morning, everyone. i'm mike owe hand lan and on behalf of peter singer and everyone else here at bookings, for the 21st century hearing on intelligence. we're welcome to have general ray odierno to speak in what could not be a more important week for american defense policy making. you're aware of budget challenges of the process and how these can affect our men and women in uniform and future military planning and current operations. no one could be a more distinguished and thoughtful person who discuss these matters than general odierno who i have great honor to know a dozen years now. he has been a friend of brookings and the a friend of the broader defense community and he has been a distinguished servant in our nation's military and our nation's defense throughout that period. he took the fourth infantry division to iraq and presided over its operations, directed its operat
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 1:00am EST
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
history again this week when her statue was unveiled in the u.s. capital. we have not gotten to see the finished product yet, not until the unveiling in a few hours. what were the logistics involved in getting across the country from california where you work and also getting it set up in the capital is. >> guest: well my partner came out several days ago to coordinate the moving of it and she was in a warehouse in a crate for a little while here in washington. i wasn't here but i saw some photographs. they had a large crane and she weighs 2700 pounds. so they lifted her up with one of those long extension cranes, narrowly guided her into statuary hall. >> host: eugene daub your firm has done other sculptures. it any significant in your experience as this one? >> guest: well you know i don't think there is any as high-profile as high-profile as this one for sure. we have done jefferson and lincoln and louis and clark and a lot of other wonderful famous and important people but for some reason russo creates a stir and i think it's timely with black history month and her 100th anniver
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 8:00pm EST
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
of the u.s. administration and barack obama himself, they understand that they are focused in, to be effective in their relationships, they have to work well together. europe is a strong partnership. >> [inaudible question] >> i think it will require important adjustments and policies on both sides of the atlantic. it will eventually be done in the time span that you outlined. >> that would be one of the adjustments needed. >> i feel that there is a new sense of realism about europe within europe. the breakup of the euro, exit from the eurozone, all of these difficulties. all of the cynics who knew all of the answers had you never had any permanent data mechanism, you will never get to a point where you make it is and it is important. the european council is now moving on. when we didn't support the tax of [inaudible] , because their implications, yet the first meeting, it was the first item on the agenda. the countries that supported this could get out of. i think during this current time, we need to start the negotiations for free trade between the eu and the u.s. the greate
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 4:30pm EST
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 4:00pm EST
came to the u.s. in the u.s. to us recall that the other side and as a child i also thought [speaking in spanish] was the other side of the map. so i thought that's where the u.s. west, on the other side of this nonsense. >> host: when did you come to the u.s. and why? >> guest: i came to the u.s. when i was nine and a half years old back in 1985 and the reason why i.t. was because my parents were already here. my father left when i was too, my mother came anonymous one and a half and my father came back to mexico. he thought we weren't taking care of by the relatives we are left with and decided to release her because he changed his mind about coming back to mexico and decided we should join him here in the u.s. >> host: how did you get to the other side? >> guest: i had to run a lot. we had to cross the border illegally through tijuana. also the first two times we got caught by border patrol, my father was hesitant to bring me at first because i was nine and half of the time many thought it was too little for the journey. we did get caught the first two times i felt immensely guilty
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 3:00pm EST
of research for students everywhere not only the u.s. but also in south asia. and i just actually returned from pakistan for 48 hours ago. i was just joking with a friend that my three days in pakistan ab about two and a half days was spent on discussing the new phenomena a religious -- [inaudible] it's become recent and new follow that that. many political leaders holding big rallies with hundreds of thousands of people coming up with the coming up with new slogans and now with the elections coming in three months or so. there's a lot of political activity. i'm focusing about seven minutes i'm given on not the -- [inaudible] and i want to add to my position in the government opposition that seeing today in my views of my perm views and not representative of dod. the landscape in what was called the -- [inaudible] that's what i focused on. this is the [inaudible] we often focus on the unsettled area which is federally. we often look at adjoining which the british had framed like this. which is about 25 million people perhaps but more than all of them together in afghanistan. so this is ver
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 10:45am EST
criticized -- >> that's because they included u.s. citizens. [inaudible] excluded u.s. citizens when -- >> that's got to be their opening salvo. >> i don't think the admiral's going to want to tell the judges they handle it that way. >> [inaudible] >> that's a waste of time. look, we have very little facts in the case. they're so sensitive that we don't even get them -- [inaudible] my responsibility. >> who made you first chair? >> the admiral mentioned my name. >> so? >> all right. i'll tell you what, we'll flip for it. >> okay. >> call it. >> heads. yeah, but -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> well, that, that's one of many, many dramatic representations of the military commission's project at guantanamo, and one thing that we learn from it is that the people involved are extraordinarily good looking. [laughter] it's actually from the television show "jag" which no longer is on the air, but it would take its storylines from cases, mainly military cases that took place, and that episode, called "tribunal," actually aired in april of 2002. so president bush issued an order a
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 8:30pm EST
reconstruction, john sopko delivered a report on you for spending so far show in the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused building. his remarks from the center for strategic and international studies in washington d.c. rfid the minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. thanks for coming today. my name name is robert laman and director of the program in crisis conflict and cooperation here at csis. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sopko who is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction known by the acronym sigar. mr. sopko has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional counsel, senior federal government adviser. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at commerce at the justice department, at the state and federal level and today he is the special inspector general f
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 6:00pm EST
in the u.s. capitol, and like all tourists, the very first thing i did when i came to washington, d.c. was to take a tour of the national mall. but when i got there i noticed something. if you just came to washington, d.c., and just went to the national, you almost believe african-americans never lived in the city. i went from one end of the mall to the other from the capitol all the way down to the lincoln memorial looking for the african-american history of washington, d.c.. and i could barely find anything. i said to myself that can't be true. i know there's african-american history in the city. it has to be african-american history of the national mall. maybe no one has bothered to sit and find out what it is and that's how this book came about. starting in the u.s. capitol, i needed my goal to find out what the african-american history of the national mall and this book is the result. i'm going to take a few minutes here today to talk about some of the things i discovered not only about the national mall, but about washington, d.c. as a city. some things i open interest you and
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 2:00pm EST
>> at now, peter andreas talks about the long history of smuggling in the u.s. from which prior to the revolutionary war, was stricken by a desire to curb domestic indices and bypass import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> at afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies for the discussion a peter andreas' new book, "smuggler: how illicit trade made america." housekeeping i have to mention some things. the way we are going to run assist fathers. to do with brief introduction and then peter will talk about the book because obviously we need to say something a context than most of you have not read the book would be a one-way conversation. i will invite catherine richard and james to say their piece on the boat and hopefully we can get stuck in a good position. after that we will open up for q&a. you will see one fixed microphone there and another vocal microphone for the site of the house. if you wish to join q&a, get up and stand behind the microphone. we have to do it this way because they are so mobile is for recording c-span a
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 5:00pm EST
to the u.s., it is very diverse. when that provision was passed there was concern was and diverse enough. since then it has become very diverse and these are adding 55,000 visas that are getting 8 million applications each year randomly allocated by computerized lottery. that is a somewhat odd way to set priorities. the commission said we should set priorities and we should deliver on them and the diversity visa program fell then and i think we would say now that it doesn't rise to that level of priority compared to the other priorities. >> the time of the gentleman has expired and recognize the gentleman from idaho for five minutes. >> thank you mr. chairman. i am excited that we are having this hearing. i think it's important to we modernize the immigration system. we agree we have a broken immigration system but we need to find a solution to the problems that we have by being fair. we need to be fair to the millions of americans that want to follow the rules law. we need to be fair to the millions of people that are waiting in line to come to the united states and i think we have to b
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2013 8:00pm EST
to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifices, their support to our nominees throughout the years which is so essential to the success of our nominees and as is the committee's tradition are nominees are invited to introduce any family members or friends who may be with them this morning with their opening remarks. if confirmed general austin will assume command of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
the u.s. and his country. you can see that live at 4:00 p.m. eastern. it will be on our companion network, c-span. we continue the prime time booktv programing later tonight looking at civil rights move. wed look at authors, mary francis berry and taylor brand. that will be. on c-span 3 tonight at same time, american history focusing on american artifact. we have smithsonian curator, eleanor jones harvey. she will talk about photographs and paintings from the civil war. all that here on the c-span networks. >> okay. folks. okay. we're going to get the second keynote speaker started here while you're enjoying your lunch. but first i would like to thank our gold sponsors for supporting us today. they are centurylink government, blue coat federal, hewlett-packard, info blocks, juner per networks, lockheed martin, net app, palo alto networks, red hat, red seal networks, taurus advanced, enterprise solutions and verizon. special thanks to those. as we enjoy our lunch i will introduce miss tina kune. vice president of northrop grumman and one of our diamond response source for today's -
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 11:00am EST
officials about oil, iraq, iran, arab-israeli, u.s.-saudi, so geopolitical issues. and when i retired from the journal in 2006, the one thing i was really interested in doing with my newfound time was trying to understand saudi society. how did saudis look at each other, what was the society like, how do they look at the rulers. how do they look at us? and as i speak about saudi arabia, everyone constantly asks me, why did you do that? why did you spend five years month after month going there? dressed in my long black -- my editor asked me that actually when i turned in the manuscript. she said, you know, why did you do this? and i said, because it's interesting that and she said, harris is interesting. interesting. [laughter] so why did you do this? you know, make me understand. that was her only editing going on the book. so i will try to make you understand why i found it both fascinating and important. saudi arabia is probably the strangest country you will never see. it is so different from our own. a woman and there never reaches the age of maturity. she is always under the control
CSPAN
Feb 13, 2013 12:00pm EST
aliens now. there have been promises of a u.s. visit program, an entry exit system to track everyone entering into the country to make sure they exit in time. that was first promised back in 1986, ten years later, 1996, congress passed another act to require a fully integrated entry-exit system and full implementation by 2005. guess what, madam president, 2005 has come and gone, it's been 30 years since that initial promise was made. we still don't have an operational effective u.s. visit system. madam president, my colleague from alabama mentioned another glaring example, the fence, the secure fence act. in 2006 we actually passed it in legislation. the secure fence act of 2006 promised to achieve operational control of the entire border. operational control the entire border. and it defind operational control. quote, "the prevention of unlawful entries into the united states including entries by terrorists, unlawful aliens, instruments of terrorism, narcotics and other droon band" -- close quote. well, we clearly haven't achieved that. in fact, we're so far from that goal, d.h.s. h
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 1:00pm EST
private censorship does not have it. this those exemptions are all different. the u.s. fair use law is the one that is most flexible and most adaptable to new circumstances and in the way most abstract. it basically says the descent into an different and you're only taking as much as is appropriate, go ahead and make new cultures. practice what happens in many commercial businesses, including publishing an international film coproduction and distribution is if it is in the u.s. outcome is usually just about everywhere. one of the reasons that's true with other nations do not have statutory damages for which her great big fines and casey made a mistake it goes far beyond the cost. so in other places, there just isn't much of a financial motivation to really go after people unless they're actually stealing. go at us as interesting as places that have not had fair use are increasingly looking at fair use system and they want to adopt. the united kingdom is probably the latest and most vivid example because they believe they are stopping innovation unless they loosen not their ability t
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 6:00am EST
to introduce our witnesses. the undersecretary for domestic finance of the u.s. depth of the treasury is with us. we also have a member of the board of governors of the federal reserve system. we have the chairman of the federal deposit insurance corporation and tom curry the comptroller of the currency. richard cadre is the director of the consumer financial protection bureau. alyse walder is a chairman of the securities and exchange commission. gary kensler is a chairman of the commodity creating commission. i thank all of you again for being here today. i would like to ask the witnesses to please keep your remarks to five minutes. your full written statements will be included in the hearing record. under secretary miller, you may begin your testimony. >> chairman johnson, ranking member crepo and members of the committee thank you so much for the opportunity to be here today. the dodd/frank wall street reform and consumer protection act represents the most comprehensive set of reforms to the financial system since the great depression. americans are already beginning to see benefit
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2013 9:00am EST
of the u.s. senate. on nights watched key public policy this. and every week in the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> the programs that we had all under -- >> we are live now as u.s. chamber of commerce is hosting a quarterly briefing today on the outlook for the u.s. economy. martin regalia, chambers chief economist will talk about recent gross domestic product figure and what policy the obama administration and congress to propose to help stimulate the economy. this is just getting under way. >> a prime example of our ability to involve experts and debates on topics that are critical to the business community. i'm going to start us off today by queuing a video from christopher giancarlo of the gfi group, our sponsor, for this series. but for some want to make a brief announcement. this series, this economic series that we pose every quarter, has been accredited by the national association of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing prof
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 9:00am EST
gathering. he may also touch on preventing cyber attacks on the u.s. like the one over the weekend blamed on china and threats from terrorists and rogue nations. he will be speaking at george washington university, and that starts at 6:30 p.m. with the u.s. in the unbreakable is week we're featuring some of booktv's we can programs on prime time here on c-span2. tonight former iraq and afghanistan general begins at 8 p.m. eastern with stanley mcchrystal and then fred kaplan, david petraeus, also jeffrey engel discusses a collection of essays on the goal for. >> the economy is at china basin is communism in name only these days. it's to preserve the power of the members of the communist party. but they basically threw most of the ideology aside when deng xiaoping opened the country up and is now a capitalist haven. the communism in china, they talk the talk at great length of these party congresses about marxism, leninism, to do. it's all about preserving the party power economic as a country continues to grow because they threw aside the most vestiges of common is alongside the in north k
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2013 5:00pm EST
fan. if the masters or u.s. open are on, i'm not going to interrupt her. she also loves football and that's appropriate because i've also learned that she is a master of the awbled. in 2008 i was heavily involved in an effort to bring volkswagen's u.s. production facility to chattanooga. just before one of the final meetings in tennessee, a planeful of decision-makers was stuck on the tarmac in germany without clear action to land in the u.s. some kind of paperwork issue. anybody who has been involved in a major recruitment effort knows that in something like this, even a small glitch can be a major setback. the volkswagen folks called me. i talked with ramona. i am not entitled sure what she did but i'm sure it was all legal and above board. at one point she was sitting there jockeying several phone calls on th on the switchboard d talking the plane off the runway in germany. the volkswagen executives landed in the u.s. highly impressed with ramona lessen. shortly thereafter, they chose chattanooga for her u.s. production facility. she was a home run no doubt. i think ramona's g
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2013 12:00pm EST
: this is "the new york times" from february 20th. budget cuts seen as risk to growth in the u.s. economy. the cuts, most likely would reduce growth by 1 1/2 of a percentage point in 2013, according to a range of government and private forecasters. that could be enough though to again slow the arrival of a recovery, producing instead another year of sluggish growth and high unemployment. >> guest: well i guess if you take it from "the new york times" perspective you could make that argument because i think they see already a slowing in growth happening and this makes a convenient fall person for bad public policy been in place under four years of obama administration. we have slowed growth. it has been very stagnant. there are a lot of reasons for it. there are a lot of friction points put in place in our economy that need to be fixed. until we get our confess and the president of the united states to work together and begin to remove those friction points we'll continue have slow growth. if you look at a same slide you had up a moment ago ago, shows the sequester on the right hand of tha
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 12:00pm EST
prepare for defense against the threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say, that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to be working with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again, trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and that trade and investment, and for prosperity and liberty to take root in this entry, any dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so for those initial comments, i will turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick the as always, very comprehensive argument. the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told the house
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 5:00pm EST
that are likely not to succeed, so it doesn't make more sense to invest in that they bring in a whole u.s. infrastructure, which we probably cannot sustain which will probably take us months to understand what's going on. it increases our influence. it forces us to be catalytic and captures local talent that makes it much more sustainable. we've all talked about it for years and we still don't produce it. the first response is to send me 10 or 15 internationals. even the best of us in a new job it takes months to figure out which are doing. a new country or new job should be more complicated. common sense would head in this direction. i guess the final point i would raise and this is an important one. and everyone of these cases, help is needed. and i must every case they don't want us to take over. so covert assistance to the kind were offering visits with these places need and want, but we should be much more respectful of the fact it is not ours to own them furthermore in a place we haven't really found it to be a very happy experience. cities are some of the rules we are refining us t
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 11:00am EST
. unfortunately, it's impossible to carry out that size experiment in the u.s., but there are thousands of traditional societies in which children already did grow up with even much more freedom are much less freedom than in the modern u.s. by examining what actually does or did happen in traditional societies that are much more varied than modern american society, we need able to learn things of practical value to us in deciding how to raise our kids, how to treat our older people, how to remain healthy and other things that we care a lot about. tribal society should be scorned as primitive and ms. well, but also they shouldn't be idealized as happy and peaceful. when we learn of travel practices, some of them will horrify us but their other tribal factors of which when we hear about them, we may admire and envy them and wonder whether we could adopt those practices ourselves. to get some perspective on how we treat elderly people in western modern societies, let me tell you the opinion of a friend of mine from the fiji islands in the pacific who had this idea of the united states. it
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 9:00pm EST
surprised that they had behavior at 16. it keeps corrections from happening. in addition, the only way the u.s. government can manage the deficit is because the federal reserve's ability to print on it. today the federal reserve couldn't print money. i don't think the u.s. -- he would not be creditworthy if you couldn't print money and that creates a huge temptation for politicians. i'm not the label discipline physical policy until he do with monetary policy. you have very specific areas to lead to the financial crisis. in the late 1990s, alan greenspan is head of the federal reserve, wanted to be a hero in us getting ready to retire and we had a minor correction. so greenspan wants to go on a good note city starts lowering interest rates, the effective printing money and he creates negative real interest rates. you can borrow turn on to criticize in the appreciation rate on housing, which invented a huge investment in housing and then right at the end of his term, greenspan realizes he's screwed up and he and his successors start raising interest rates rapidly and create something called an
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 8:00am EST
order issued earlier this month and the increasing number of cyber attacks on the u.s. from china. then a discussion about nuclear weapons in the middle east and america's declining influence in the region. after that we're live with the closing session of the nation's governors' annual winter meeting as they discuss personal responsibility in relation to government policies with their guest, tv's dr. oz. and later the senate returns at 2 eastern following its weeklong presidents' day recess when senator kelly ayotte delivers the annual reading of george washington's farewell address. >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest widows in the colonies, and during the revolution while many her mid '40s, she was of considered an enemy by the british who threatened to take her host aage. later she would become our nation's first first lady at age 57. meet martha washington tonight in the first program of c-span's new weekly series, "first ladies: influence and image." we'll visit some of the places that influenced her life including colonial williamsburg, mount vernon, valley forge an
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
year in the u.s. come involving transportation crashes, 32,000 of those occur on the nation's highways are 95% of all of our transportation fatalities. so what do i see is the biggest risks we face in our nation's highways? first, impaired driving. the ntsb on this issue in our most wanted list of safety improvement. where the top 10 list of things that they can be changed. and impaired driving really had up that list. that is the number one killer of transportation. 10,000 people every year are killed and impaired driving accident. they made recommendations based on a study was completed and released in december and so we be happy to talk with you all about technology and i mentioned that later. another issue that's gotten attention is distraction. they are ubiquitous in transportation our life and i see many of them on the table here inside sure many of you will be using some electronic devices later after the embargo. when we talk about distractions in all modes of transportation. i'm pleased to be our investigations in a series that your interest is. >> we paid extra for this good
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2013 12:00pm EST
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 9:00am EST
the last year to really broaden the u.s. knowledge of what's going on in syria, who the key players are. and i think if you end up, if you're getting close to a circumstance where there might be either rationalized or let's call it a highly decentralized result to the conflict, then you really want to know 100 people. you don't want to be dependent on just walking a white horse down main street at damascus and hoping that some leader jumps on and we go. so this is the kind of sort of ground, foundation building that you have to undertake and that we've done. >> could you tell us something a little more specific about how you're actually doing that? do you know 100 people in aleppo? you've got a team of 200. are you able to get people on the ground, work with others? >> sirree is a really good challenge, because you have to work out of a third country, which has its own for distinct feelings about what's going on inside of syria and what it might mean to them. so we're working -- up until the last two weeks, we have worked exclusively in turkey. and then we, now we started to work in jor
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 7:00pm EST
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2013 9:00am EST
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 6:00pm EST
and u.s. secretary of state governor bush appointed the secretary of state of florida from 2005 to 2007. she has taught at ford service institute as the co-chair of the u.s. the part of state mandatory seminar for the newly appointed ambassadors and in an interesting twist she spoke at stanford university where secretary rice is a very distinguished member of the faculty and former provost and the university of miami school of law. she was the u.s. ambassador to the republic of iceland during the administration of george h. w. bush and during the ronald reagan administration he served as the under secretary and assistant secretary at the u.s. department of commerce where he was responsible for trade, development, export, and international travel and tourism and he was appointed by the florida governor jeb bush and charlie crist to serve on the statewide board. both sue and chuck serve on the board of directors of the council of american ambassadors. she's a deval graduate of stanford while we can't claim him as an ally, he's a longtime member and past chairman of the board of the univer
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 8:00am EST
and statistics. is really true when you are looking at farm numbers and statistics. that is the case with the u.s. department of agriculture statistics. the problem with this analysis on subsidies is the statistics that are used by usda assert that we have 2.2 million farmers. the agency is probably very embarrassed about the lousy job they have been doing because they are lying with those statistics. a close look at the numbers shows that usda numbers count the one third of two.2 million entities that have failed under $1,000 and two thirds of those entities have failed under $10,000. those are not profits, those are sales. those are the small businesses down the road from my family farm. i don't run, my husband runs. i have a neighbor who may sell $10,000 of grapes a year to a winemaker down the road. i am not sure if he sells that many and i have a friend who has come close and has a flower business during the summer. i know she makes under $1,000 in the summer growing flowers for a local restaurant. she does it because she enjoys it. these are not farmers, these are not people who consider th
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 12:00pm EST
night this week while the u.s. senate is on presidents' day break, we are featuring booktv in prime time. tonight, the financial industry of what led to the crisis. >> all of that live tonight on c-span. >> from the very start we told the board that the approach we're going to take, which was pretty straightforward, and remember, we were sent there to sort of fix gm. that was the nation, is go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused. i brought the message we were going to design, build and sell the world's best vehicles. we're going to move quickly. we need your support, and we need your input. and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or didn't get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger question of financing, morale, positioning marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that. and we kept them informed and you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and a government bailout, former chairman and ceo ed whitacre on "american tu
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 12:45pm EST
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 7:00pm EST
out that societal experiment in the u.s. but, there are thousands of traditional societies in which children already did grow up with either much more or much less freedom than in the modern u.s. by examining what actually does or did happen in traditional societies that are much more varied than modern american society, we may be able to learn things of practical value to our -- to decide how to raise our kids to achieve our older people, remain healthy and other things that we care a lot about. tribal society should not be scorned as primitive, miserable, but they should also nobile di -- the idealized as happy and peaceful. when we learn of travel practices, some of the more horrifying, but there were other tribal factions which one we hear about them, we may admire and envy them and wonder whether we can adopt those practices ourselves. to get some perspective on how we treat elderly people in western, modern society, let me tell you the opinion of a friend of mine from the seat -- islands in the pacific to have visited the united states. there were some things my friends admire
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 9:00pm EST
, u.s., geopo litical issues. when i return all -- retired from the "journal" one thing i was interested in doing with my new found time was trying to understand saudi society. what did the society looks like? how did they look at their rulers, us? as i speak about saudi arabia people constantly ask me why did you do that? why did you spend five years going bear dressed -- they're dressed in black. my editors said why did you do this? i said because of interest be. she said paris is interesting. [laughter] why did you do this? may meander stand that was her own the editing point*. so i will try to make you understand why i found it both fascinating and important. saudi arabia is probably the strangest country will never see. it is so different from our own. a woman never reaches the age of maturity, she is always under the control of some man. she cannot go to her son's school she cannot see her son graduate. she obviously doesn't drive drive, we know that and does not appear in public without being covered and with the worst situations, it just chattel for a man to do as
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